Posts Tagged 'diet'

The Royal Treatment

Hello Marquette Employees,

Due to Alicia moving on to the next chapter of her life and finishing up her time with us at Employee Wellness, I am pleased to announce that I will be taking over for this summer season! It was gratifying to see her develop and grow throughout her wellness journey, and I am more than thrilled to continue sharing mine. I will be posting about all aspects of health and wellness motivated by what intrigues me and what I genuinely find useful. I could only hope that my content has the potential to let us all grow in our wellness journey together.

Anyways as promised, today’s blog is an inside look on the diet preparations Prince Harry and Meghan Markle had to go through in time for their royal wedding that recently took place on May 19, 2018. Since June is just around the corner, that only means one thing. Wedding season is upon us! Whether you are attending a wedding this coming month or summer as a guest, a part of the entourage, or as the celebrant yourself, there has never been a better excuse to look your best, since the pictures that will be taken that day will remain as a long-lived memory for whoever takes part in it.

Meghan Markle is a firm believer in the concept of balance and moderation. Although she supports a more plant-based diet and limits her meat intake, she allows herself to a little more flexible in the weekends. In correspondence to her plant-based diet, she relies on fresh food to keep her fueled throughout the day such as smoothies, mixing it with beneficial ingredients such as almond milk, chia seeds, to really boost its nutrients. She likes to resort to green juice as alternative source instead of coffee to kickstart her day. Diet aside, she couldn’t have gotten into the shape she is today without sweating. The fitness routine she swears by is Lagree Fitness Method on the Megaformer machine. The regimen gives you a full body workout with quick and effective results that incorporates cardio, strength-training, and flexibility. To change her routine up a bit, she likes to alternate with yoga. Her consistency is responsible for how she was able to maintain the shape she has today, without feeling the need do much work in preparation for the big day.

As for Prince Harry, his preparation did not vary too much from Meghan, since she has been cracking down on staying within a routine. His diet involved a lower carb and meat intake and cutting out unhealthy habits such as smoking and drinking. Meghan’s influence has led to his new smoothie obsession. He has been supplementing his diet by working out every day to stay toned and fit for the wedding.

Diet is not a one size fits all. You don’t need to be royal to have access to a life of health and wellness. Although Meghan has influenced Harry to make some improvements when it comes to eating habits, she encourages that “It’s not a diet; it’s lifestyle eating.”

Long live the Duke and Duchess of Sussex!

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Diana Banzon

 

The Pros and Cons of a Pescatarian Diet

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In the spirit of Lent, it is tradition that Catholics are expected to refrain from meat on Fridays. The tradition eludes back to the significance of fasting in correspondence to Jesus’ sacrifice when he died on the cross. Technically, “warm-blooded” animals were considered to be off limits, because they were considered to be an animal that was “sacrificed its life for us,” explains Michael Foley, an associate professor at Baylor University and author of Why Do Catholics Eat Fish On Friday? The importance of consuming fish for sacred holidays also plays a role as to why it is implemented in tradition, even during pre-Christian times. In regard to being forced to avoid meat every Friday throughout Lent leading up to Easter, I was curious as to the benefits and disadvantages of maintaining a pescatarian diet outside of purely religious restrictions.

It is widely known that consuming seafood provides numerous health benefits when implemented into any diet. Fish, in specific, is low in fat, yet high in protein, which is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids only do wonders for boosting the brain and helping encourage its development. It play a significant role, since our bodies are unable to produce these fats naturally and can’t live without them. It decreases our chances of dying from heart attack, by reducing inflammation, regulating the heartbeat, lowering blood pressure, relaxing the artery walls, and ensuring blood is less likely to clot. Heart problems are ranked as the most common way to die in the United States, with statistics showing that it is kills one in four people among men and women. Taking precautionary measures, is the best way to avoid falling into this common statistic and ensuring a longer, healthier life.

As for the disadvantages of a pescatarian diet, it is no surprise that is it will be more difficult finding ways to gain nutrients that meat is known to heavily provide. Pescatarians need to be more cautious in making sure they have enough protein, iron, zinc, calcium and vitamin B12 implemented within their diet. Making sure that pescatarains are consuming the correct amount tends to be a more difficult task due to how expensive they can be in the market. It makes sense since the world’s supply is so limited. According to Dr. David Jenkins, University of Toronto professor who is a Canada research chair in nutrition and metabolism, “If we continue to consume fish at our current rate “we’ll run out by 2050”. Farmed fish don’t always have the same benefits, due to having a bigger chance of catching disease, in comparison to wild fish who feed off of algae, as oppose to being fed fish meal. Mercury contamination is a bigger concern among larger fish, that is why it is advised to eat fish that lower in the food chain, such as sardines or anchovies, which rely on algae as a main source for their diet.

As you can see, not all diets are perfect. There will always be benefits and disadvantages, no matter how healthy the options may seem. It is a matter of choosing a diet that fits YOUR lifestyle. Most importantly, a diet that is easy to maintain that you know you are capable of keeping up with and having the constant motivation to stick with it.

 

Happy Lenten Season to All,

Diana Banzon

Lifestyle is everything

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Welcome back from Thanksgiving break, Marquette! I hope you all had a wonderful holiday, a relaxing, rejuvenating break, and some much needed family time. My short break was all of those things and more, just not long enough. But that brings me to my next thought though, there’s only a few weeks left of the semester. Less than two weeks of classes, and then we are into finals week. I cannot believe how quickly it has gone by, and I am sure you are thinking the same thing. And with that thought, comes some impending anxiety about the last push. In my case, all of the projects and presentations, all of the papers, and all of the exams. Maybe for you, all of the grading, or all of the other deadlines approaching.

I know I have said it before, but it is more important now than ever: step back and destress. Now crunch times can be stressful for anyone, but having anxiety can make deadlines and pressure all that more stressful. We are lucky to have some wonderful campus resources for dealing with anxiety, and other mental health struggles. Now, I completely understand that even thinking about talking to someone about anxiety would just give you even more anxiety, but I assure you, it shouldn’t. There are a lot of misconceptions about anxiety (or any mental health concern in general) that give it a stigma, making it seem like a bad thing, like struggling with mental health makes you weak. But these misconceptions are just that, they are wrong, and it is worth talking about. And, according to David Spiegel, Stanford University’s associate chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, “avoidance is not a good strategy.” Even I could have told you that, but when it comes from an expert on the subject, it reassures the idea even further. I have spent a lot of time running from my anxiety, but when I recognized and acknowledged it, I was then able to also recognize and acknowledge some great ways to help live my everyday life more fully and freely.

I am a big advocate for making lifestyle changes in order to deal with health related issues. This includes my struggle with an autoimmune disease, depression, and anxiety. And a lot has changed since I wrote that first blog over a year ago. I have come to terms with what I can do for myself through my lifestyle. There are more connections between lifestyle and health and wellness than people realize. When your body is given the proper care it needs and deserves, it is amazing what it will return to you. Eating healthy, exercising, and taking care of your spiritual and emotional wellness won’t solve everything, it isn’t a miracle cure. It seems as though many people expect it to be, and that makes it difficult to follow through on a lifestyle change. It can be disheartening to start eating healthy or to begin a new exercise routine and to not see results right away. It can take a while, but I assure you it is worth it. You may not see immediate changes in your health or how your body feels. In fact, you may even feel worse for a while, maybe you will be tired and groggy, or you will get headaches since your body is used to a lot of sugar, and other harmful ingredients. So, in spirit of what I assured at the beginning of the semester, let’s do this together and make this our best year yet with a lifestyle change.

You don’t have to do anything crazy or drastic if you don’t want to. Start off small to make it easy. Make a small change: eat more fruits and vegetables, cut your daily bowl of ice cream to once a week, get up in the morning and go for a walk or do some yoga, and don’t be afraid to get help from others, because we are not on this earth alone and we do care. Have a productive, but stress-free week, and I will talk to you next Tuesday.

Alicia Diedrich

Wellbeing Biography: Ben Eccles

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Well-being: the state of being happy, healthy, or successful.

Since becoming aware of how important my wellbeing is, I have always found it interesting that we as humans constantly barter our wellness for some other medium of satisfaction. For example, I know that I love Chinese food. Not the traditional dish you would be served in China, but the greasy “Americanized” Chinese food. I love the smell, I love the taste, but the feeling I have the morning after a night of Chinese food is something I wouldn’t wish on my worst enemy. After an experience like that, you would think I would never return to the sweet and sour chicken I love so much, but you can bet that a few weeks later, I will be on the phone ordering that same dish. Why? Why would I subject my wellbeing to that torture?

While I admit that not everyone feels the same way about fried rice and egg rolls, we all have our own “Chinese food.” Most of us probably have multiple things that we do even though we know there is really no long-term positive affect to them (and possibly a negative long term affect!). It doesn’t take a nutritionist to tell you that your double fudge brownie adds little to no nutritional value to your diet, or that your daily Diet Coke isn’t really very good for you. We all make choices that are poor for our health, and my theory behind why we do these things is that we don’t value our wellbeing nearly as much as we should.

This became clearer than it has ever been for me during my freshman year of college. I, along with most college-aged people, didn’t value my wellbeing very much at all. I didn’t eat particularly well, my workout schedule started strong but fairly quickly I had eradicated the gym completely from my weekly routine, and I probably averaged around 5 hours of sleep per night. The affects of these choices didn’t hit me immediately. They were gradual, and once in action, they were very hard to counteract. My grades began to suffer, I started napping in class, and the Freshman 15 became a very real thing for me.

This was one of the most confusing times in my life. I was having all of these great experiences as a young college student living on his own for the first time. But at the same time, my mental, physical and emotional state was pretty severely damaged by the poor decisions I was making. I remember very clearly the night all of this truly dawned on me. I was in the McCormick basement studying for a chemistry exam and it was almost 4 o’clock in the morning. This wasn’t an every day thing, but it happened often enough that I just accepted the fact that a good night’s sleep wasn’t an option on a night before a test. Once I finished studying, I packed up my things, and dragged myself to my room to catch 3 hours of sleep before my 9 a.m. chemistry class. As you might have guessed, I bombed the test. It was almost like I hadn’t studied at all. My thoughts were so scrambled by my lack of sleep that I could hardly read the questions on the pages. After this experience, I was always more aware of how my current decisions were going to affect my future self.

The point of this story is not to make anyone (including myself) feel bad about the decisions made. I think it is important to indulge in ones personal pleasures every once in a while because I think that is how we get the most joy out of our lives. But hopefully after reading this article, you can more consistently say no to things that may cause some immediate satisfaction or relief but are detrimental in the long run. Awareness is truly only a small part of the battle, but acting in favor of your wellbeing will ultimately lead you to a better, happier life.

What’s “wellness” and how can I get it?

PrintHello to my fellow Golden Eagles! My name is Ben Eccles and I am one of the brand new Wellness Program interns for this school year. I am so excited to get involved with everything our wellness program has to offer, but first let me tell you all a bit about myself.

I have just started my junior year in the college of health sciences studying exercise physiology. I work as a desk receptionist in Carpenter Tower and as a campus tour guide. My hobbies include playing volleyball, soccer and basketball with my friends and trying to teach myself how to cook because I can’t rely on the meal plan anymore.

As interesting as I might seem, that is not the main focus of today’s post. I wanted to share some insight on how I view wellness. Many people (including myself at times) think that they are too busy to eat well, live well and feel well, but I believe a great way to fight this misconception is with knowledge. Allowing yourself to learn is the first step you can take to become the best version of you.

So what does wellness mean? Most people believe wellness is going for a run every day or eating green vegetables with every meal. While those things can nurture a healthy life style, not everyone has the ability or the option to do them. Being asked to define wellness as I am studying to be a wellness professional is something that can’t be done in simple terms.

Wellness, the way I have learned it, has 8 dimensions. Meaning there are 8 different facets of life for us as individuals to be well in. These dimensions are emotional, financial, social, spiritual, occupational, physical, intellectual, and environmental. I’m sure that at least half of these are fairly simple to understand in terms of wellness, but what on earth does occupational or intellectual wellness mean? I have provided a list that I found from samhsa.gov of brief definitions for all of these dimensions to give you an idea of what each of them mean.

Emotional Wellness – the ability to effectively cope with life and create meaningful relationships

Financial Wellness – satisfaction with current and future financial situation

Social Wellness – developing a sense of connection, belonging, and a well-developed support system

Spiritual Wellness – expanding our sense of purpose and meaning in life

Occupational Wellness – personal satisfaction and enrichment derived from one’s work

Physical Wellness – recognizing the need for physical activity, diet, sleep and nutrition

Intellectual Wellness – recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills

Environmental Wellness – Good health by occupying pleasant, stimulation environments that support well-being 

That is all I have for today! I will be back soon to expand on these ideas and cover new topics in health and wellness.

 

Ben

Summer Cookout Series: Glazed Bacon Cheeseburger

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Photo via Debra McClinton

Hello friends! We are hitting the middle of summer, so I hope your cookouts are roaring! With only a few weeks left in July, I would like to give you a quick main course idea, healthily upgraded of course.

This juicy stuffed burger is an upbeat and easy twist to the classic cookout meal. Complete with a bacon and cheese stuffing, this glazed burger is sure to keep you guests coming back for seconds.

Ingredients

3 tablespoons of dark brown sugar
1½ teaspoons of paprika
½ teaspoon of garlic powder
½ teaspoon of ground cumin
¼ teaspoon of chipotle powder (chili powder works too!)
¼ teaspoon of salt
¼ teaspoon of ground black pepper
1 pound of ground turkey
½ cup of low-fat shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
6 slices of cooked, crumbled turkey bacon
4 whole-grain rolls

Directions

  1. Heat grill to a medium temperature. Mix the sugar, spices, salt and pepper in a small bowl and set to the side. Mold the ground turkey into 8 round patties. Combine the cheese and crumbled turkey bacon together in another bowl, and then place an equal amount of the mixture on only  4 of the patties.
  2. Place the remaining 4 patties over the cheese and turkey bacon mixture. Press the edges of the burger to seal. Generously pat and cover each burger with the sugar and spice mixture. Grill until it is as done as you’d like! Enjoy!

Summer Cookout Series: Parmesan BLT Salad

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Photo via Alison Miksch 

Nothing says summer like a good cookout! For the rest of July I would like to share with you some family recipes that I love to see at cookouts I’ve attended in the past.

To start off the menu, here’s one of my favorite sandwiches turned into a healthier salad version! Behold, the Parmesan BLT Salad!

Ingredients

2 1/2 cups of cut-up, cubed white bread
3 tablespoons of melted butter
1 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon minced shallot
1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup of buttermilk
3/4 cup of mayonnaise
1/2 cup of grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of black pepper
1/8 teaspoon of sugar
12 ounces of chopped romaine lettuce and spinach
1 1/2 pounds of sliced cherry tomatoes
6 slices of cooked, chopped turkey bacon
 Flat-leaf parsley and torn basil leaves to garnish

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 375°.

2. Prepare Croutons: Toss together bread, melted butter, salt, and pepper in a medium mixing bowl. Place on a baking sheet, and bake 7 to 8 minutes. Remove from oven, and set aside.

3. Prepare Dressing: Combine shallot and vinegar in a medium mixing bowl, and let stand for 5 minutes. Whisk in buttermilk and next 5 ingredients.

4. Make Salad: Arrange romaine lettuce and spinach on a serving platter. Top with sliced tomatoes and chopped bacon, and drizzle with 3 Tbsp. of dressing. Add croutons, parsley and basil. Serve right away with leftover dressing on the side.

Wa la!


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