Posts Tagged 'mindfulness'

Mindfulness Meditation

I hope this week finds all of you in a peaceful, calm, and relaxed state of mind. I am anything but all of these right now! I am moving to a new apartment today, and it’s only a block away from where I was living. Needless to say, my day is a little hectic! So even if you are finding yourself in the midst of some crazy life change like me or just any old stressful day, week, or month, I’d like to remind you it will all be okay. But make sure you’re taking some proactive steps to help yourself along the way to a relaxed mind so you don’t get too stressed out. We’re lucky here at Marquette because we have lots of great resources to help you work towards a life of wellness.

One of these great resources is the free Mindfulness Meditation sessions that are held every week. Now I’ve definitely heard it before. “How is sitting there in silence and meditating going to help me?” And I have definitely been skeptical about it before, but this year I was given the opportunity and motivation to have a new experience with meditation. This past spring semester I took Theology 2310 – Explorations in Christian Theology with Dr. Nussberger. In this class we were assigned a project to spend half of the semester regularly performing or participating in any kind of prayer practice. I chose to do at least 10 to 15 minutes of meditation daily for the remainder of the semester. I did a quiet meditation where I focused solely on my breathing, allowing all of my other thoughts to escape my mind. And while this was not always an easy task with my crazy-busy, racing mind, it was well worth it in the end.

I could not believe what just a few minutes of silence could do for me. Letting myself turn off my brain from all of my worries and everything on my to-do list. Before my quiet meditation days I never realized just how necessary it is to give all of your body a break: yes, including your brain! Now, if you’re unsure how to get started on meditation, let’s backtrack to the Mindfulness Meditation classes that I mentioned. There’s just a few more weeks left of the summer session, so get started on your meditation now! Join this week’s Mindfulness Meditation on Wednesday from 12:15 to 1 in AMU 233. If you end up loving the Mindfulness Meditation, don’t worry that the summer session is almost over, we will surely be back with another session this fall! Mindfulness is just one step in the direction of living a life of wellness, but being mindful in your everyday decisions on nutrition, exercise, and a well mind are the key to overall well-being. Meditation is a great way to achieve a new level of mindfulness.

Hopefully discovering Mindfulness Meditation will allow you to find yourself in a new, relaxed and peaceful state of mind despite whatever craziness is going on in your life, just like it did for me. Happy meditating!

Alicia Diedrich

Me, myself and mind

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As an active person, sometimes the easiest thing you do each day is go to the gym or get your workout in. For me, this is just part of the routine; I usually have a worse day if I miss getting my daily pumping of iron. Most people don’t realize that there is another side to living a healthy lifestyle – intellectual wellness.

Just as important as it is to be physically fit, being mentally fit is a staple to a well life. Intellectual wellness stems from just feeling good, channeling curiosity and feeding creativity. Some vague terms, yeah? It can be hard to know what is actually curbing boredom or what is stimulating your brain cells. In all, anything that makes you really think is doing wonders for your intellectual wellbeing.

If you’re trapped at a desk all day or stuck in a job where you just go through the motions each day, try a few of these mind-pumping ideas in order to get the nerve juices flowing and keep your brain healthy and strong, just like your body.

 

Coloring – That’s kindergarten stuff, Sarah. No, friends! It is not. Mandala and destress coloring of really intricate pictures works as an awesome mind-winddown after a long day of intense, brain heavy work. Focusing on the hues and the lines is a sweet break after a long day of words and numbers. You can find oodles of adult stress-free coloring books in book stores.

Sudoku – Think you’ve had enough of numbers? Think again. Sudoku is a solid way to let numbers become a game. This helps the mind problem solve on a simple level. By perfecting the steps toward reaching the right answer of the sudoku puzzle, your brain adapts some thinking methods for real-life problems.

Poetry – Yup, that’s right. A quick throwback to high school English class with some ambiguous poems can be a great step away from the daily norm for your mind. By giving the descriptions a shot at interpretation, you test your head to think in a way that paints pictures in your mind. With colorful, detailed mental images, this helps cool down the firing neurons that have been working to boredom all day.

Optical illusions – I don’t know about you, but these frustrate the heck out of me sometimes. Optical illusions function perfectly as a challenge, especially if you haven’t seen the illusion before. While these can grow a little weary on the eyes, they dare your mind to think outside the box in order to pretty much change perception of the illusion.

Give these brain busters a shot and exercise your mind to keep it sharp and strong. Intellectual wellness is just as important as taking care of your body. Don’t be hesitant when it comes to feeding your curiosity.

Finding mindfulness in everyday life

While it may seem to you at times that feeling lost, overwhelmed, and worried are very modern problems, they have been around for a long time. Mindfulness is an ages-old tool that has been refined by practitioners in the 21st century to be practical and applicable to the digital age.

Paul Norton will introduce the background of the practice and give us introductory training in the valuable techniques of meditation and mindfulness-based stress reduction. Dr. Norton is a pediatrician presently practicing developmental behavioral pediatrics. Paul is also a practicing Buddhist in the tradition of the Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh. He is a founding member and current president of the Mindfulness Community of Milwaukee and is a popular speaker and inspiring teacher.

Come get a taste of mindfulness practice!

When: Monday, November 5, 3:30-5:00 pm 
Where: Raynor Memorial Libraries, Beaumier Conference Center B/C

Sponsored by the Marquette Contemplative Community
Questions? Contact alice.gormley@marquette.edu


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